Coronavirus testing

Those who are double-jabbed, no longer have to self-isolate if they come into contact with someone who has tested positive for the virus. This also applies to under-18s. They are however advised to take a PCR test.

There are different tests you can get to check if you have coronavirus. The test you need depends on why you're getting tested.

The 2 main tests are:

  • PCR tests – mainly for people with symptoms, they're sent to a lab to be checked
  • rapid lateral flow tests – only for people who do not have symptoms, they give a quick result using a device similar to a pregnancy test

Both tests are free.

If you have symptoms of coronavirus

Get a PCR test as soon as possible if you have any of these symptoms, even if mild:

  • a high temperature
  • a new, continuous cough
  • a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste

Stay at home until you get your test result – only leave your home to have a test.

Regular tests if you do not have symptoms

Anyone can now get regular rapid lateral flow tests without having symptoms.

About 1 in 3 people with coronavirus do not have symptoms but can still infect others. You should do a rapid test twice a week (every 3 to 4 days) to check if you have the virus.

If people test positive and self-isolate, it helps stop the virus spreading.

Even if you’re vaccinated, there’s still a chance you can pass coronavirus on, so you should keep getting tested regularly.

Other reasons to get tested

Confirming a previous test result

Get a PCR test as soon as possible if:

  • you've done a rapid lateral flow test and had a positive result or your test sample could not be read (void result)
  • you had a PCR test and your test sample could not be read

If you have symptoms, stay at home until you get the result of the 2nd test.

If you've been in close contact with someone who's tested positive

If you've been in close contact with someone who's tested positive for coronavirus you can get a PCR test, whether or not you have symptoms.

Getting tested can tell you if you had coronavirus at the time you did the test.

If you test positive, you can help the NHS contact people who may have caught the virus from you. They can then self-isolate and avoid passing it on to others.

Going into hospital

You may need to get tested if you're due to have surgery or a procedure.

The hospital will arrange this for you. Contact your hospital department if you have any questions.

Travelling abroad

If you're travelling abroad, you may need to get a test before you travel.